Smashwords Summer/Winter Sale

July marks the annual sale at ebook retailer Smashwords, and my ebooks there are 50% off through the end of this month. (Yeah, I’m a little later than I wanted to be with this post, but at least you’ve still got 11 days left.)

Real Dragons Don’t Wear Sweaters on Smashwords

Wishing Season on Smashwords

Huntress on Smashwords

Smashwords carries all ebook formats, including epub, mobi (for Kindle), and PDF. And if you like what you read, please leave a review!

Smashwords 2017 sale

 

Smashwords sale – 75% off my books in July!

Smashwords Summer_Winter SaleSmashwords is having their annual Summer/Winter sale promotion during the month of July, and I’ve added my ebooks to it, so for the month of July all my ebooks on Smashwords are 75% off. That makes Real Dragons Don’t Wear Sweaters and Wishing Season free, and it drops Huntress to just $1.25. (Six Impossible Things is, of course, always free.)

These prices are only good on Smashwords through July 31, using the coupon code SSW75.

You can see all my Smashwords stuff at my profile:

https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/RCarterHall

And you can view and search all the Smashwords books in the Summer/Winter sale (25% off, 50% off, 75% off, or free) here:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/category/1/newest/1

And as always, whether you get your copies from Smashwords, Amazon, or somewhere else, please consider leaving a review after you’ve read them. Reviews help other readers find the stuff they’ll like, so they’re pretty important for authors like me who are still building their audience.

Interview! + something for your Kindle

I love being interviewed – I mean, media-type interviews, not job stuff. (I don’t know who really likes job interviews in and of themselves, but I’m sure there’s somebody out there. If so, awesome. You do you.)

Anyway, this is the cool talk-about-your-writing kind of interview. It’s a Member Spotlight from the Furry Writers’ Guild, and it was still fun to answer the set of questions even though I was the one who wrote them back when I started the Member Spotlight feature almost two years ago. A bit like hiding your own Easter eggs, but it’s still a good set of questions, I think:

https://furrywritersguild.com/2016/05/25/member-spotlight-renee-carter-hall/

I also wanted to note that if you haven’t picked up a copy of my mini short story collection Six Impossible Things, it’s finally being price-matched again at Amazon, so you can get it free for your Kindle right here. (And it’s always free at Barnes & Noble, iBooks, Kobo, and Smashwords, if you’d rather.)

sixcoversmallThe ebook features six of my odd little fantasy stories, and let’s face it, where else are you going to find stories with casts made up of humans, imaginary friends, a talking raccoon named after junk food, a cartoon tiger, a werewolf, and the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse? For free?

(Nowhere. I’ve looked. That’s why I had to write these things myself.)

On the writing front, last night I sent out my first non-reprint short story submission of the year, which makes me feel more like a “real” writer again and less like somebody who just sort of used to be one. Obviously the first half of the year has been a little sparse for me, but I’m starting to get myself back on track now, so I’m hoping the second half of 2016 will be a lot more productive. I’m also going to be doing a big overhaul/redesign of my website soon, which I’m actually kinda looking forward to, even though I know it’s going to be a lot of work. (And I haven’t forgotten about Three From Waynesboro, either; look for a new post there later this week.) As always, sign up for my mailing list so you won’t miss anything important!

 

Good company: Three anthologies

I’ve been lax about posting anthology acceptances/publications lately, but I wanted to call attention to three recent ones in particular that have been published within the furry fandom — not just because they feature my work, but also because I love their concepts.

anthrocenturyAn Anthropomorphic Century features stories from 1909 (“Tobermory” by Saki) to 2008 (my story “The Wishing Tree”), all involving anthro characters. It’s not often you get the chance to share a table of contents with authors like Philip K. Dick and Peter S. Beagle, so it was fun to have my lighthearted trickster-raccoon story added to the range of styles and voices.civcover

Civilized Beasts is, as far as I’m aware, the first all-poetry anthology from furry, and I’m hoping that “2015 Edition” subtitle means more will follow in the series. This charity anthology benefits the Wildlife Conservation Society, and it includes my poems “Pulse,” “Why I am Sometimes Jealous of the Cat,” “Panthera tigris,” “Hermit Crab,” and “Canis,” plus poems from twenty (!) other poets, all celebrating the diversity, beauty, and wisdom of the creatures with whom we share the planet.catscover

The most recent of the three, Cats and More Cats, is… well, just what it says. Cats of all kinds, domestic and wild, starring in stories from a variety of authors. Again, it’s an honor to have my story “The Emerald Mage” included in the same pages as work from Andre Norton, Elizabeth Ann Scarborough, and especially Clare Bell (whose book Ratha’s Creature made a big impression on me when I read it somewhere around age 10 or 11). Mary E. Lowd’s “Magtwilla and the Mouse” is also a poignant read.

So if you’re tired of reading about humans all the time (and really, we are tiresome sometimes, particularly in election years), give these a try. There’s so much variety in each of these anthologies, you’re bound to find something to enjoy.

Win a Wishing Season prize pack!

WishingMy holiday short story collection Wishing Season, released as an ebook last year, is now available in paperback from Amazon — and to celebrate, I’m having a giveaway. I love settling in on a winter evening with a cup of hot chocolate and a good book, so the winner will receive:

  • A signed paperback copy of Wishing Season
  • A 16 oz. holiday stoneware mug
  • Three packets of specialty hot cocoa mix

wsgiveaway1

Wishing Season features seven of my holiday-themed short stories, including “The First Winter,” which recently appeared as part of this special bear-themed episode of Podcastle. Wishing Season is also the only place to read my story “Santa’s Summer Vacation” — it was written just for this collection.

To enter:

  • You must be signed up for my mailing list (sign up here if you’re not already subscribed).
  • Send an email to reneecarterhall at gmail.com with the subject line “Wishing Season giveaway.”

The fine print: Open to US residents only. Only current mailing list subscribers are eligible to win. Giveaway ends at 8 AM Eastern on Monday, December 21. Winner will be notified by email.

Good luck!

 

Two Halloween treats…

Just in time for Halloween, my funny/sweet ghost story “The Spirit of Pinetop Inn” is now up at Podcastle, as part of a ghost-themed episode with stories from two other authors:

http://podcastle.org/2015/10/20/podcastle-386-flash-fiction-extravaganza-ghostly-interludes/

You can listen to or download the podcast there, and of course they’re also on iTunes.

I was hoping to have something new to share here for Halloween, but since RainFurrest I’ve been busy with work, life, the FWG, and trying to get Wishing Season prepped to launch a print edition before Black Friday. So instead, here’s something many of my non-furry readers probably haven’t encountered yet: my short story “Hellhound,” which first appeared in the Rabbit Valley anthology Trick or Treat.

Rating this PG for mature themes but no explicit content.

 

Hellhound

by Renee Carter Hall

 

The cage was small, but being confined was nothing new for him.

The dog in pen #4 at the Braddock County Animal Shelter couldn’t remember why or under what circumstances he’d been caged before, only that the sense of restriction, of obedient waiting, was intensely familiar. With it came the sense—the certainty—that sooner or later, someone would come for him, and things would be all right.

He ached all over. There was food and water in metal bowls, but he didn’t want it. Mostly he slept, head on paws, dreaming of things he forgot the moment he woke.

The people here were not the same kind of people he was used to seeing, that was certain. These people were pale and fat, and their faces were open and trusting. If he hadn’t been able to imagine them twisted in agony, eyes dark with pain and suspicion, ribs casting shadows on sunken bellies, he would not have thought that these were people at all.

He knew that he, too, had changed somehow. His body felt softer, weaker than it had before. Somewhere—he was certain of it—he had been muscle and sinew and fangs, not the silly, tongue-lolling creature he seemed to be now.

He didn’t understand why this change had happened. But this was not where he belonged.

“Hey, Troy,” the voice came. “See if the one in four’s eaten anything.”

A moment later, footsteps scuffed on the concrete as the man came to his cage. Calling him a man was being too generous, though. He had a man’s height but a boy’s face, especially in the eyes.

He looked weak.

“Hasn’t touched it,” Troy reported back, sounding bored. That was wrong, too. There should have been fear in his voice, or at least despair—not this casual indifference.

 My master would snap you in two, he thought suddenly, and the thought confused him even more.

 Master…

Yes, he had one, but it felt so long ago and even more distant than the scattered fragments of his dreams. Even so, longing rose in him. He wanted to claw at the bars, at the floor, at the air, bite and scrape and dig, to get out, to get back to him.

 Master, he thought dully, staring at nothing, why won’t you come?

 

*   *   *

 

“I’m looking for something big,” Laura said as the teenager led her down the shelter’s row of cages. It sounded like a stupid thing to say, like one of those people who turned pets into status symbols or accessories, as if she might also choose its color to complement her living room.

But as silly as it sounded, it was what she wanted. Right now she needed all the confidence she could get, and as cute as the little terriers and toys were, she wanted something at the end of the leash with more of a solid don’t-mess-with-me attitude.

 And maybe then, she thought, I can learn more of that myself. She was tired of seeing fear in the mirror, tired of catching that scared-rabbit look in her eyes.

Still, she reminded herself, she’d had good reason to look that way. The fear in her life had a body and a name, a name she’d carried as part of her own until the papers finally came through two weeks ago. She’d told herself she wouldn’t live in fear, not anymore, but it still hung about her, clinging. She’d always wanted a dog, but he’d never liked animals—and really, that should have been her first clue—but now, as new and terrifying and wonderful as it was, she was doing something she wanted at last.

She hated places like this. It was clean enough, but nothing could hide the musty smell of concrete wet with disinfectant, or the scent of too many dogs in one large, tunnel-like room. And although she decided it was melodramatic to think that the place smelled, as well, of hopelessness and a kind of mute despair, she couldn’t deny that it felt true.

She passed a grey-muzzled golden retriever that made her heart ache; an animal that age would probably never make it out. The next cage held a gangly puppy with a good bit of border collie in its lineage, followed by a red hound whose deep, tolling bark thrummed in her chest. She paused before that last one—it looked solid but not overly threatening—then decided to survey all the cages before she looked at any of them more closely.

She saw him in the last cage.

He had been lying with his chin on his paws, staring at nothing, and when she passed, his eyes flicked to hers. Only an instant, but enough.

Such unusual eyes…

It wasn’t their size or color—he had the same soulful brown eyes as any other dog in the shelter—but a quality she couldn’t quite define. Intelligence, but more emotional. Longing, but not melancholy. He was waiting. Maybe he was waiting for her.

“Could I see this one?” she asked.

The teenager winced. “Um… Well, you can, but that one’s been here three days and won’t eat. We were gonna take him over to the vet this afternoon. We’ve got a lab mix you might like…”

Before, she would have politely gone to look at the lab. This time, she stopped, as her therapist had taught her, and asked herself what she truly wanted to do. “I’d really like to see this one.”

He looked at the dog, then back at her, shrugged slightly, and unlocked the cage.

The dog looked like he’d been put together by someone with only a vague patchwork idea of what a dog should be. He was tall and lean and almost gangly, big but not thick. His scruffy coat was mostly black with splatters of white, and the fur stuck up in odd places. One ear pricked up; the other flopped down. His long tail was feathered, though the rest of his coat was medium length at best. He left the cage cautiously, not edging out or cringing—he wasn’t afraid of her—but as if he were checking her out, testing her presence as much as she was testing his.

He sniffed her hand and let her pet him. She scratched behind his ears, and his tail swept in a slow arc, then faster, and his mouth came open in a dog’s smile. The air relaxed between them, and Laura smiled back.

“This one.”

Continue reading

Christmas in July sale!

WishingSince Christmas is far too magical to celebrate just once a year, I’m having a Christmas in July sale with my ebook Wishing Season: Holiday Tales of Whimsy and Wonder.

For the month of July only, you can get Wishing Season at Smashwords for just 99 cents (75% off the original price) using the coupon code ZW63S. This is the only time I’ll be putting Wishing Season on a special sale, so if you missed getting a copy back in December, now’s the time. 🙂

Wishing Season is a collection of 7 holiday-themed short stories:

“The Gingerbread Reindeer” – When Santa finds himself one reindeer short for the Christmas run, the frost-elf Boreas enchants a replacement. But there’s more than elf-magic being worked, and when an ancient foe threatens them all, the gingerbread reindeer finds he’s made of more than just flour and sugar.

“Special Delivery” – It’s Christmas Eve, and Phillip Cottington–a.k.a. the Easter Bunny–is already planning for spring. But when a letter intended for Santa gets delivered to him instead, Phillip has to make sure it gets through in time.

“Holly’s Jolly Christmas” – All the young reindeer Holly dreams of is to be part of Santa’s team, but no one will give her the chance–until a child’s letter starts her on a path that will take her places she never imagined.

“An Older World” – Jakob the toymaker lives in a world of grief, until a special toy gives him a chance at a new life.

“The First Winter” – A mother bear tells her cubs the story of how First Bear defeated Death. (New to this collection, and I really love how it turned out.)

“Nativity” – An orphaned girl finds an unusual place to belong.

“Santa’s Summer Vacation” – By order of Mrs. Claus, Santa and his head elf Fussbudget travel to the magical island of Serendipity to relax on the beach. But Maelstrom, evil King of the Eighth Sea, has other plans for Santa. (Exclusive to this collection!)

Get your copy for 75% off using the coupon code ZW63S here:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/499463

Just click the “Buy” button and enter the coupon code to get the special price. After purchase, you can download the book in any format you like — Smashwords offers all major electronic formats, including mobi (Kindle), epub, and PDF. And if you like what you read (or, hey, even if you don’t), I’d really appreciate it if you’d leave a quick review on Smashwords, Amazon, or Goodreads and tell potential readers what you thought of the book.

(And one last thing — I’ve just started up a mailing list, so if you want to be the first to hear about sales like these, new releases, and other news, plus get exclusive bonus fiction, sales, giveaways, and whatever else I think up to send out, you can sign up here.)